briefs of how i work

Such a long time since I last blogged. Oh oh oh.. by the way… This week I was checking out my 2011 diary and found the most interesting four lines ever written by me about me…

When I write a story

I describe a lot

When I write poetry

I become very short…

 

Funny, ain’t it? 😛

Leprechaun

The name leprechaun is derived from the Irish word leipreachán, defined by Patrick Dinneen as “a pigmy, a sprite, or leprechaun”.

The earliest known reference to the leprechaun appears in the medieval tale known as the Echtra Fergus mac Léti (Adventure of Fergus son of Léti). The text contains an episode in which Fergus mac Léti, King of Ulster, falls asleep on the beach and wakes to find himself being dragged into the sea by three lúchorpáin. He captures his abductors, who grant him three wishes in exchange for release.

The leprechaun is said to be a solitary creature, whose principal occupation is making and mending shoes, and who enjoys practical jokes. According to William Butler Yeats, the great wealth of these fairies comes from the “treasure-crocks, buried of old in war-time”, which they have uncovered and appropriated.

The appearance of a leprechaun varies with the eras. The modern day Leprechaun is described as sitting on a toadstool, with red beard, wearing a green hat and green garments.

Some folk traditions hold that the leprechauns are descended from the Tuatha de Danann. When the Milesians came to Ireland (according to the Book of Invasions) they conquered the Tuatha de Danann and forced them to live under ground (this connects them to the aes-sidhe).

When Christianity took religious precedence, this may have brought about the decline of importance (and thus, size) of the leprechauns.images (81)

Phoenix

In Greek mythology, a phoenix or phenix is a long-lived bird that is cyclically regenerated or reborn. Associated with the sun, a phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity. While the phoenix typically dies by fire in most versions of the legend, there are less popular versions of the myth in which the mythical bird dies and simply decomposes before being born again.

In terms of physical appearance, the phoenix, when pictured or described in antique and medieval artwork and literature, will sometimes have a nimbus (a physical feature that emphasizes the phoenix’s connection with the sun).  Quite often, the oldest images of phoenixes on record would have nimbuses with seven rays, just like Helios (the personified sun in Greek mythology).

The phoenix was, generally, believed to be colorful and vibrant; Tacitus claimed that this was one aspect of the bird that made it stand out from all other birds. Some thought it had peacock-like coloring, although there was no clear consensus about the mythical bird’s coloring in antiquity (although Herodotus’ claim of a red and yellow theme is popular in many versions of the story on record). Ezekiel the Dramatist claimed that the phoenix had red legs and striking yellow eyes, but Lactantius claimed that its eyes were blue like sapphires and that its legs were covered in scales of yellow-gold with rose-colored talons

.phoenix_by_sandara-d4o2ewxThe-Fire-Phoenix